PSYC101 Introductory Psychology I

Updated: 29 September 2015
Credit Points 6
Offering
Responsible Campus Teaching Period Mode of Study
Armidale Trimester 1 Off Campus
Armidale Trimester 1 On Campus
Armidale Trimester 3 Off Campus
Intensive School(s) None
Supervised Exam There is a UNE Supervised Examination held at the end of the teaching period in which you are enrolled.
Pre-requisites None
Co-requisites None
Restrictions PSYC100
Notes None
Combined Units None
Coordinator(s)
Unit Description

PSYC101 and PSYC102 are the two introductory psychology units which are the prerequisites for enrolment in second year psychology units. PSYC101 and PSYC102 may be studied in either order in Trimesters 1 and 2 respectively and may be studied concurrently in Trimester 3. Together they present an introductory overview of the subject matter and methods of psychology. Topics covered in this unit comprise: an introduction to the science of Psychology; research methods; biological bases of behaviour; sensation and perception; consciousness; learning and conditioning; memory; motivation and emotion; and lifespan development.

Prescribed Material
Mandatory

Shrink Wrapped Package(s):

Note: Students are expected to purchase prescribed material. Please note that textbook requirements may vary from one teaching period to the next.

Psychology: From Inquiry to Understanding plus MyPsychLab Access to Experiments

ISBN: 9781486025800
Lilienfeld, S. and others, Pearson 2nd Aust. ed. 2015

Note: Package includes: Lilienfeld, S. and others, Psychology: From Understanding to Enquiry, 2nd ed. (ISBN 9781486006786) and MyPsychlab Access to Experiments (ISBN 9781486022380).

Text refers to: Trimester 1 and 3, On and Off Campus

Text(s):

Note: Students are expected to purchase prescribed material. Please note that textbook requirements may vary from one teaching period to the next.

An Interactive Approach to Writing Essays and Research Reports in Psychology

ISBN: 9781742166490
Burton, L.J., Wiley 3rd ed. 2010

Text refers to: Trimester 1 and 3, On and Off Campus

Disclaimer Unit information may be subject to change prior to commencement of the teaching period.
Assessment
Title Exam Length Weight Mode No. Words
Essay 35% 1200
Relates to Learning Outcomes (LO) and Graduate Attributes (GA)

LO: 2, 4, 5 and 6 GA: 1, 2, 4, 6 and 7

Laboratory Work 5%
Assessment Notes

Participation in research studies within the discipline (or alternative readings and multiple choice quiz)

Relates to Learning Outcomes (LO) and Graduate Attributes (GA)

LO: 4 GA: 1 and 7

Online End-Trimester Quiz 5%
Assessment Notes

End-Trimester assessment: Multiple choice, matching exercises

Relates to Learning Outcomes (LO) and Graduate Attributes (GA)

LO: 1-5 GA: 1-4, 6 and 7

Online Mid-Trimester Quiz 5%
Assessment Notes

Online Mid-trimester assessment: Multiple choice, matching exercises

Relates to Learning Outcomes (LO) and Graduate Attributes (GA)

LO: 1-5 GA: 1-4, 6 and 7

Final Examination 2 hrs 15 mins 50%
Assessment Notes

Multiple choice

Relates to Learning Outcomes (LO) and Graduate Attributes (GA)

LO: 1- 5 GA: 1, 3, 4, 6 and 7


Learning Outcomes (LO) Upon completion of this unit, students will be able to:
  1. demonstrate coherent theoretical knowledge of the nature of psychology as a scientific discipline and the historical and philosophical background of the major perspectives of psychology (eg behavioural, biological, cognitive, evolutionary, humanistic, psychodynamic, and sociocultural);
  2. apply the concepts, language, and major theories of the discipline to explain psychological phenomena, with the ability to communicate this effectively to others;
  3. develop foundation knowledge in the following core topics in Psychology: a) biological bases of behaviour, b) consciousness, c) lifespan development, d) learning, e) memory and cognition, f) sensation and perception, and g) motivation and emotion;
  4. review and examine the different research methods used by psychologists and identify the utility and shortcomings of several types (descriptive research, correlational research, experimental research) of research methods;
  5. develop and apply critical thinking skills in evaluating psychological literature and questioning claims that arise from myth, stereotype, pseudoscience or untested assumptions; and
  6. correctly employ the American Psychological Association (APA) structure and formatting conventions in the formation of written essays.

Graduate Attributes (GA)
Attribute Taught Assessed Practised
1
Knowledge of a Discipline

Students are taught to understand the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings, and historical trends in the core topics of psychology. These are taught through lectures and class discussions and assessed via all assessment tasks.

True True True
2
Communication Skills

Students are taught to communicate effectively in writing in accordance with the style guidelines of the American Psychological Association. Effective written communication is assessed through online tests and a major essay assignment.

True True True
3
Global Perspectives

Throughout the unit reference is made to international perspectives, with some sections of the unit addressing cultural variations to common psychological phenomena. This is an assessed component of the unit.

True True True
4
Information Literacy

Students learn how to assess the utility of psychological literature and critically examine these sources. This is an assessed component of the unit.

True True True
5
Life-Long Learning

The skills you acquire in this unit to identify, organise and communicate psychological information provide the basis for life-long learning.

True
6
Problem Solving

Problem-solving skills are developed and practised in online laboratory experiments and assessed in most assessment tasks.

True True True
7
Social Responsibility

Students are taught that psychological principles can be used to help address societal problems. This knowledge is assessed in all assessment tasks.

True True True
8
Team Work

Reciprocal cooperation is encouraged in online discussions and students are encouraged to form study groups and work collaboratively.

True