Bachelor of Health Practice

Why study the Bachelor of Health Practice at UNE?

The Bachelor of Health Practice prepares students for practise as health professionals with a focus on the community sector. Students may choose to major in casework, recreational therapy, aboriginal health or complementary medicine. The course also provides admission pathways for current health professionals with vocational sector qualifications in a range of fields such as community, complementary, rehabilitation and allied health. The Bachelor of Health Practice prepares graduates who are safe, capable, confident, culturally sensitive and able to apply principles of evidence based practice and lifelong learning throughout their professional careers.Graduates will be eligible to apply for membership of the following:

Australian Infant, Child, Adolescent and Family Mental Health Association (www.aicafmha.net.au)

Australian Association of Gerontology (www.aag.asn.au)

Australian Diabetes Society (www.diabetessociety.com.au)

Australian Disease Management Association (www.adma.org.au)

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Career Opportunities

Community services case worker, assessor, case coordinator or welfare worker; family, early intervention, aged care or youth worker; diversional or recreational therapist or coordinator; aboriginal health worker in a range of community contexts; higher level employment in current field of complementary, allied, aboriginal, rehabilitation or community health practice.

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Degree Snapshot

DURATION

Up to 10 years Part-time
1.5 or 2 or 2.5 or 3 Years Full-time

FEES

Commonwealth Supported Place

2016 STUDY OPTIONS
Armidale

Trimester 1, Off Campus

Official Abbreviation BHlthPrac
Course Type Undergraduate
Commencing
Responsible Campus Admission Period Mode of Study
Armidale Trimester 1 Off Campus
Course Duration
  • Up to 10 years Part-time
  • 1.5 or 2 or 2.5 or 3 Years Full-time
Fees Commonwealth Supported Place
Total Credit Points 144
Intensive Schools

There are no mandatory intensive schools in the Bachelor of Health Practice.

Entry Requirements

A candidate shall:

(a) be qualified for admission (see Admission Undergraduate and Postgraduate (Coursework) Rule and Admission Undergraduate and Postgraduate (Coursework) Procedures); or

(b) hold an AQF Level 5 Diploma in Community Services Work; or

(c) hold an AQF Level 5 Diploma in Leisure and Health; or

(d) hold at least an AQF Level 5 qualification in an approved Health related discipline for entry into a specified major; or

(e) hold at least an AQF Level 5 qualification in an approved Health related discipline for entry into the general program; or

(f) hold at least an AQF Level 6 qualification in an approved Health related discipline for entry into the general program; or

(g) hold an AQF Level 6 qualification in a complementary medicine discipline for entry into the Complementary Medicine major.

Additional Requirements

All students must complete a Working with Children Check application. http://www.kidsguardian.nsw.gov.au/working-with-children/working-with-children-check

Practical, Clinical or Work Experience

Assessment tasks for some units require students to apply theoretical concepts by spending a minimum of 20 hours in a workplace context. Depending upon the Admission Rule and the Major selected, students may need to gain up to 240 hours of experience in an appropriate workplace over the duration of their candidature. Students are expected to organise their own work placements; those who are already working in health or community services may be able to complete these requirements in their usual workplace. For students who are not currently working in health or community services, 'Workplace context' and 'workplace experience' can cover a wide range of situations, such as:

formal classroom settings;

tutorial groups;

clinical placement;

simulation lab sessions;

clinical lab sessions;

group settings such as childcare, playgroups, youth groups and church groups;

casual, part time or volunteer work (not restricted to healthcare settings);

Senior First Aid courses;

The New England Award.

Similar principles including leadership, teamwork, communication, social justice and transcultural considerations apply across these contexts.

Students who are uncertain about how to fulfill the workplace context requirements for assessment tasks can discuss this with the Course Coordinator prior to enrolment, or with their Unit Coordinator after enrolment.

Advanced Standing

Candidates admitted under Rules (b) and (c) shall be granted 48 credit points of Block Advanced Standing based on their admission to candidature. Up to a further 48 credit points may be granted based on units that were not part of the degree on which admission was based.

Candidates admitted under Rule (d) shall be granted 24 credit points of Block Advanced Standing based on their admission to candidature. Up to a further 72 credit points may be granted based on units that were not part of the degree on which admission was based.

Candidates admitted under Rule (e) shall be granted 36 credit points of Block Advanced Standing based on their admission to candidature. Up to a further 60 credit points may be granted based on units that were not part of the degree on which admission was based.

Candidates admitted under Rule (f) and (g) shall be granted 72 credit points of Block Advanced Standing based on their admission to candidature. Up to a further 24 credit points may be granted based on units that were not part of the degree on which admission was based.

Academic Colours

Peony Red (BCC 37)

Further Information

You can find instant answers to many of your questions or contact UNE directly via AskUNE

These course rules & plans are ONLY to be used if you commenced, transferred or changed versions in the Bachelor of Health Practice in 2016.

Admission to Candidature

A candidate shall:
(a) be qualified for admission (see Admission Undergraduate and Postgraduate (Coursework) Rule and the Admission Undergraduate and Postgraduate (Coursework) Procedures); or
(b) hold an AQF Level 5 Diploma in Community Services Work; or
(c) hold an AQF Level 5 Diploma in Leisure and Health; or
(d) hold at least an AQF Level 5 qualification in an approved Health related discipline for entry into a specified major; or
(e) hold at least an AQF Level 5 qualification in an approved Health related discipline for entry into the general program; or
(f) hold at least an AQF Level 6 qualification in an approved Health related discipline for entry into the general program; or
(g) hold an AQF Level 6 qualification in a complementary medicine discipline for entry into the Complementary Medicine major.

To view complete list of approved AQF qualifications for entry from Rule (d) or (e) or (f) or (g) - List of approved AQF qualifications click here.

Additional Requirements

All students must complete a Working with Children Check application.
http://www.kidsguardian.nsw.gov.au/working-with-children/working-with-children-check

Advanced Standing

Candidates admitted under Rules (b) and (c) shall be granted 48 credit points of Block Advanced Standing based on their admission to candidature. Up to a further 48 credit points may be granted based on units that were not part of the degree on which admission was based.

Candidates admitted under Rule (d) shall be granted 24 credit points of Block Advanced Standing based on their admission to candidature. Up to a further 72 credit points may be granted based on units that were not part of the degree on which admission was based.

Candidates admitted under Rule (e) shall be granted 36 credit points of Block Advanced Standing based on their admission to candidature. Up to a further 60 credit points may be granted based on units that were not part of the degree on which admission was based.

Candidates admitted under Rule (f) and (g) shall be granted 72 credit points of Block Advanced Standing based on their admission to candidature. Up to a further 24 credit points may be granted based on units that were not part of the degree on which admission was based.

Period of Candidature

For candidates admitted under Rule (a) the period of candidature shall be:
(a) three years as a full-time candidate;
(b) up to ten years as a part-time candidate.

For candidates admitted under Rule (b) and (c) the period of candidature shall be:
(a) two years as a full-time candidate;
(b) up to six years as a part-time candidate.

For candidates admitted under Rule (d) and (e) the period of candidature shall be:
(a) two and a half years as a full-time candidate;
(b) up to six years as a part-time candidate.

For candidates admitted under Rule (f) and (g) the period of candidature shall be:
(a) one and a half years as a full-time candidate;
(b) up to six years as a part-time candidate.

Course Requirements

To qualify for the award a candidate must pass units to the value of 144 credit points.

Program of Study

Candidates shall complete an approved program of study as outlined in the Course Schedule comprising:

For candidates admitted under Rule (a)
Course Structure Credit Points
Major 144 cps
Total 144 cps

Aboriginal Health
Case Work
Recreational Therapy

For candidates admitted under Rule (b)
Course Structure Credit Points
Block Advanced Standing 48 cps
Major 96 cps
Total 144 cps

Aboriginal Health
Case Work
Recreational Therapy

For candidates admitted under Rule (c)
Course Structure Credit Points
Block Advanced Standing 48 cps
Major 96 cps
Total 144 cps

Aboriginal Health
Case Work
Recreational Therapy

For candidates admitted under Rule (d)
Course Structure Credit Points
Block Advanced Standing 24 cps
Major 120 cps
Total 144 cps

Aboriginal Health
Case Work
Recreational Therapy

For candidates admitted under Rule (e)
Course Structure Credit Points
Block Advanced Standing 36 cps
General Program 108 cps
Total 144 cps

General Program

For candidates admitted under Rule (f)
Course Structure Credit Points
Block Advanced Standing 72 cps
General Program 72 cps
Total 144 cps

General Program

For candidates admitted under Rule (g)
Course Structure Credit Points
Block Advanced Standing 72 cps
Major 72 cps
Total 144 cps

Complementary Medicine

Award of Degree

1. Candidates who meet course requirements and who have not specialised shall be awarded the Bachelor of Health Practice.

2. Candidates who meet the course requirements and who specialise shall be awarded the Bachelor of Health Practice in one of the following: Aboriginal Health, Case Work, Complementary Medicine or Recreational Therapy.

Appeals

Candidates are referred to the Academic Assessment Appeals Policy and the Academic Assessment Appeals Procedures.

Improper Conduct

Candidates are referred to the Student Coursework Academic Misconduct and Plagiarism Rules and the Student Coursework Academic Misconduct and Plagiarism Rules - Plagiarism Investigation and Penalty Guidelines.

Course Aims

This course prepares students for practice at Bachelor level (AQF 7) as health professionals in the community sector. The course also provides admission pathways for current health professionals with qualifications at AQF Level 5 or 6 in a range of fields such as community, complementary and allied health, and rehabilitation to undertake a breadth and depth of study resulting in outcomes at AQF Level 7. The Bachelor of Health Practice prepares graduates who are safe, capable, confident, culturally sensitive and able to apply principles of evidence based practice and lifelong learning throughout their professional careers.

Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
  1. apply a biopsychosocial perspective to assessment of individual and group health needs;
  2. design, deliver, monitor and evaluate safe, sensitive, ethical, evidence based and culturally appropriate health programs appropriate for individuals and groups across a range of settings, demonstrating an understanding of the structure, function, competing demands and conflicting priorities of the health care system;
  3. communicate effectively with clients, with health professionals from a range of disciplines, and with the wider community, applying knowledge, skills and techniques appropriate to specific settings and situations;
  4. demonstrate advocacy and facilitative skills for individuals and groups, including those who are vulnerable as a consequence of one or a combination of factors;
  5. maintain and extend professional knowledge and skills through application of lifelong learning principles; and
  6. research, analyse, critically evaluate and communicate ideas and solve problems, with intellectual independence.
Graduate Attributes
Knowledge of a Discipline

Health practice as a discipline is taught from theoretical foundations through application in practice from a range of perspectives and across a range of contexts. Graduates may choose to further develop existing discipline-specific knowledge and skills or expand their field of practice to include new discipline areas. Graduates will have been assessed on both generalised and specific knowledge through completion of a variety of assessment tasks including online quizzes, written essays, case studies, log books and annotated bibliographies. Transcultural awareness and associated culturally competent practice are taught as underpinning theory and contextualised in practice across a range of health settings. Global perspective as this applies to professional practice is assessed as a focus in specific course units and as a part of modules within a range of units throughout the course, through a range of written assessments.

Communication Skills

Communication is taught, assessed and practised as a fundamental component of health practice. Students develop written, verbal and non-verbal interpersonal and interprofessional communication skills built upon strong theoretical foundations through sequential completion of coursework units having professional communication as their focus. Students' communication skills are developed progressively throughout the course and encompass generalised and specialised knowledge and skills appropriate for communicating with clients, co-workers, a range of interdisciplinary health professionals and members of the community.

Problem Solving

Problem solving skills are taught progressively throughout the course as an integral part of health practice. Students apply problem solving skills to case and workplace based scenarios which form the basis of a range of assessment tasks. Graduates are equipped with a breadth and depth of problem solving skills enabling them to work creatively, productively and efficiently as individuals and in groups.

Information Literacy

Graduates will have been taught how to recognise relevant information and use appropriate media, tools and methodologies to locate, access, analyse and apply this information. As a focus of specific units and as an aspect of a number of others throughout the course, students are assessed on the development of their capacity to critically evaluate information and its sources, and apply information critically and appropriately, through written essays, case studies, log books and annotated bibliographies.

Ethical Conduct and Social Responsibility

Ethical conduct and social responsibility are the focus of specialised course units as well as being a unifying theme throughout the course. Students are taught both generalised and context specific legal and ethical principles and the applications of these to their field of health practice. Ethical conduct and social responsibility are the focus of a number of unit assessment tasks including written essays, reports, log books, case studies and annotated bibliographies.

Lifelong Learning

Graduates will have developed the knowledge and skills to apply their learning to a range of contexts, and to adapt to change from both within and from outside their workplace or organisation. These skills are taught as a focus of specific course units and as components of a number of others, and are assessed and practised through a range of case based activities. Graduates will have the capacity to apply these skills in an ongoing and self-reflective capacity throughout their professional and personal lives.

Independence and Collaboration

Independent learning skills are developed and extended to independence in professional practice. Collaboration is taught as a fundamental skill in health practice and is assessed throughout the course. Collaboration skills are developed progressively as a focus of specific course units and as components of a range of other units throughout the course. Independent and collaborative work are practised in a range of work place and related or simulated contexts beginning with theoretical foundations and progressing to more complex, case based scenarios.

How to Apply

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