Bachelor of Criminology/ Bachelor of Laws

Why study the Bachelor of Criminology/ Bachelor of Laws at UNE?

The University of New England offers a flexible approach to the study of law. UNE boasts one of Australia's largest law schools outside a capital city, as well as being an early adopter of innovative technology in the delivery of its law programs.

Studying law in conjunction with another discipline gives you the potential to take an interdisciplinary approach in both your studies and in your future employment.

Graduates of this double degree will have a highly developed understanding of the law and its relationship with the principles underpinning criminology eg forensic science, the criminal process and the sociology of deviance.

Bachelor of Criminology with Honours: Students who have attained a Credit average in the Criminology component with at least Distinction standard in 18 credit points at 300 level in criminology including CRIM344 Criminology and Justice Systems may be admitted to end on honours in Criminology via the Bachelor of Criminology with Honours.

Law component: The Bachelor of Laws is accredited by the Legal Practitioners Admission Board of NSW for admission as a legal practitioner in NSW and mutual recognition legislation extends admission to other Australian jurisdictions.

After completion of academic qualifications there are a range of employment options from which to choose. Graduates who wish to be admitted to practice as a solicitor, barrister or legal practitioner anywhere in Australia will also have to undertake a course of professional legal training (PLT). This can consist of approximately half a year's full-time training, undertaken internally or externally, or of equivalent part-time training. In some jurisdictions, it may be possible to do articles of clerkship instead. Because the system adopted varies from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, enquiries should be made to the admission authority in the state or territory in which you intend to practice: this is usually a committee of the Supreme Court of that State or Territory or a special body set up to administer admissions to the legal profession. Additional information can be found on the School of Law page.

To qualify for the award of the degree with Honours, students must have successfully completed the Honours Pathway made up of LAW490 and LLM500. There are three levels of Honours: First Class Honours, Second Class Honours and Third Class Honours. Honours result will be calculated as follows: 60% LAW490 plus 40% of the GPA of LLM500, LAW400, LAW480, LAW455.

Career Opportunities

The Bachelor of Criminology is an interdisciplinary degree that may lead to a career in policy advice and development; policing and corrections; crime prevention; juvenile justice and child welfare; security industry; crime intelligence services; drug and law support services; environmental and industry regulation.

The Bachelor of Laws (LLB) degree is accredited by the Legal Practitioners Admission Board of NSW. Upon completion of the LLB, graduates may complete a period of practical legal training (PLT) and be qualified to apply for admission as an Australian Lawyer. After admission you are then eligible to apply for a practising certificate as a solicitor from the Law Society of NSW or undertake further studies to obtain a practising certificate as a barrister from the Bar Association of NSW.

Additionally, a law degree is relevant to a large range of careers including: working in legal aid agencies, advocacy organisations, commercial firms, government departments, banking, commerce, management and a wide range of businesses.

Need assistance?

Degree Snapshot

DURATION

5 Years Full-time
Up to 12 years Part-time

FEES

CSP
International

2016 ATAR / OP

84.40 / 8

2017 STUDY OPTIONS
Armidale

Trimester 1, Off Campus
Trimester 1, On Campus
Trimester 2, Off Campus
Trimester 2, On Campus
Trimester 3, Off Campus

Official Abbreviation BCrim/LLB
Course Type Undergraduate
CRICOS Code 065085G
Commencing
Responsible Campus Admission Period Mode of Study
Armidale Trimester 1 Off Campus
Armidale Trimester 1 On Campus
Armidale Trimester 2 Off Campus
Armidale Trimester 2 On Campus
Armidale Trimester 3 Off Campus
Course Duration
  • 5 Years Full-time
  • Up to 12 years Part-time
2016 ATAR 84.40
2016 OP 8
Fees CSP / International
Total Credit Points 240
How to Apply

All domestic students apply through the link below

For more information, click here

International students apply direct to UNE through UNE International

For more information, click here

Intensive Schools

There are no mandatory intensive schools in the Bachelor of Criminology component of this course. There are no mandatory intensive schools in the Bachelor of Laws component of this course. See Unit Catalogue for specific requirements.

Entry Requirements

A candidate shall be qualified for admission (see Admission Undergraduate and Postgraduate (Coursework) Rule and Admission Undergraduate and Postgraduate (Coursework) Procedures).

Assumed knowledge is any two units of English.

Advanced Standing

Candidates are referred to the University Policy on Advanced Standing.

It is not possible to award advanced standing on the basis of work experience due to professional accreditation rules or to studies that were completed in a course other than one leading to admission as a legal practitioner or to a unit that is not listed in a course leading to admission as a legal practitioner.

Scholarships

The University offers a number of faculty/college and country scholarships available to Australian citizens and permanent residents.

Academic Colours

Old Rose (BCC 157) and Ultramarine (BCC 148)

Further Information

You can find instant answers to many of your questions or contact UNE directly via AskUNE

These course rules & plans are ONLY to be used if you commenced, transferred or changed versions in the Bachelor of Criminology/ Bachelor of Laws in 2017.

Admission to Candidate

A candidate shall be qualified for admission (see Admission Undergraduate and Postgraduate (Coursework) Rule and the Admission Undergraduate and Postgraduate (Coursework) Procedures).

Advanced Standing

Candidates are referred to the University Policy on Advanced Standing.

It is not possible to award advanced standing on the basis of work experience due to professional accreditation rules or to studies that were completed in a course other than one leading to admission as a legal practitioner or to a unit that is not listed in a course leading to admission as a legal practitioner.

Period of Candidature

The period of candidature shall be:
(a) five years as a full-time candidate;
(b) up to twelve years as a part-time candidate.

Course Requirements

To qualify for the two awards a candidate must pass units to the value of 240 credit points comprising:
Bachelor of Criminology component: 96 credit points with not more than 36 credit points at 100-level and at least 36 credit points at 300-level;
Bachelor of Laws component: 144 credit points with not more than 36 credit points at 100-level and at least 36 credit points at 300-level or higher.

To qualify for the award with Honours a candidate must pass units to the value of 144 credit points with not more than 36 credit points at 100-level, at least 36 credit points at 300-level and at least 36 credit points at 400-level or higher including LAW490 and LLM500.

Program of Study

Candidates shall complete an approved program of study as outlined in the Course Schedule comprising two components:

Course Structure Credit Points Credit Points
Bachelor of Criminology component: 96 cps
Core Units 60 cps
Listed Units 36 cps
Bachelor of Laws component: 144 cps
Core Units 108 cps
Listed Units
OR
Honours
18-36 cps
OR
0-18 cps
Total 240 cps

To view complete Program of Study click here

Award of Degree

Candidates who meet the course requirements shall be awarded the Bachelor of Criminology and the Bachelor of Laws.

Pathway to Honours

Students may be awarded the degree of Bachelor of Laws with Honours on the basis of an academic record including the Honours stream deemed by the Head of School to be of sufficient merit. To be admitted to the Honours stream candidates must have completed 72 credit points of law units at UNE with a grade point average (GPA) of 5.5 or better.

Where students have completed 72 credit points of law units with a grade point average (GPA) of 5.5 or better, but not all units have been completed at UNE, with the exception of LAW400, LAW455, LAW480, then the students may be admitted to the Honours stream at the discretion of the Head of School.

Award of Honours

To qualify for the award of the degree with Honours, candidates must have successfully completed the Honours stream made up of LAW490 and LLM500.
There will be three levels of Honours: First Class Honours, Second Class Honours and Third Class Honours. Honours result will be calculated as follows: 33.33% LAW490 plus 66.67% of the GPA of LLM500, LAW400, LAW480, LAW455.
An exceptionally distinguished student who has been awarded First Class Honours with a GPA of 6.5 or above in Law units may be awarded a University Medal.

Quality in Bachelor Honours Degrees

All students as well as all individuals undertaking a supervisory role for bachelor honours students will be familiar with the responsibilities associated with research supervisors and students, the research examination procedures and procedures for handling any difficulties that might arise during supervision, and the consequences of failing in their obligations. These responsibilities are outlined in School of Law Honours Handbook and available on the School website.

Appointment of Supervisor

In negotiation with the coordinator, students are appointed a research supervisor who is an academic member of the School of Law that can appropriately supervise the topic chosen by the student. Students are encouraged to meet with their supervisor regularly and continue these meetings, where appropriate, for the duration of the unit. Although it is expected that the frequency of the meetings will tend to follow the outlined Formative Assessment Milestones e.g., submitting a proposed topic, research proposal, draft chapters and oral presentation. Meetings may be in person, online, videoconference or telephone conference. From time to time students may be requested to attend supervision meetings in person.

Thesis

(a) In order to complete LAW490, the student shall submit a thesis, embodying an independent investigation on a topic approved by the course coordinator, in a form approved by the course coordinator. The results of the student's work shall make a sound contribution to the discipline of law.
(b) Depending on the topic under investigation, the approval of the relevant Ethics Committee must be sought if required.
(c) Except with the permission of the course coordinator, on the recommendation of the supervisor, the thesis shall not exceed 10,000 words of text, excluding appendices.
(d) Students will be required to enrol in and complete the year long thesis LAW490.

Submission of Thesis

(a) The submission and presentation of the thesis must follow the guidelines set out in the Essential Guide for Studying Law.
(b) Students must comply with the Australian Guide to Legal Citation. The student may not present, as the thesis, any work that has been the basis of the award of a degree at this or another university.

Examination of Thesis

(a) The thesis is examined by two internal examiners. The examiners are selected by the unit coordinator, who will take the recommendation of the supervisor into account.
(b) The thesis supervisor shall not be one of the internal examiners.
(c) The names of the examiners will not be released to the student until after the examination process is complete and may be withheld at the request of the examiners.
(d) Examiners are normally expected to complete and return their report to the unit coordinator within FOUR (4) weeks of the thesis being delivered.
(e) The examiners may write a joint report or separate reports and are expected to recommend that the thesis (LAW490) be given a percentage mark.
(f) If the examiners are unable to reach an agreement, the unit coordinator will appoint an additional examiner to review the reports and recommendations. The unit coordinator will then recommend a percentage mark, taking into account the examiners’ reports.
(g) The unit coordinator will make a recommendation to the Board of Examiners regarding the percentage grade to be awarded for the thesis.
(h) The unit coordinator will advise the supervisor of the recommended percentage grade and provide them with a copy of the examiners' report(s). If the supervisor disputes this outcome, the supervisor should provide a report to the Board of Examiners outlining the reason for the dispute and their own recommended percentage grade.
(i) The Board of Examiners will make the final determination as to the outcome of the examination of the thesis, based on the recommendation of the examiners or, where the examiners had not been able to reach agreement, the unit coordinator.

Honours Result

Honours grades will be awarded in accordance with the University assessment policy.
Honours result will be calculated as follows: 60% for LAW490 plus 40% of the GPA of LLM500, LAW400, LAW480, LAW455.
There will be three levels of Honours: First Class Honours, Second Class Honours and Third Class Honours.

Suspensions and Extensions

The school may grant an extension or suspension of candidature, or a combination of both, to full-time candidates for up to three months or to part-time candidates for up to 6 months as follows:
(a) to compensate by way of extension of candidature, a candidate for time lost by ill-health or unforeseeable and unavoidable difficulties; or
(b) to compensate by way of suspension of candidature, a candidate who produces evidence that he/she shall not be in a position to pursue work towards the Honours thesis unit, LAW490.

Re-enrolment

A student, who has previously withdrawn from enrolment in the honours program, must meet the admission requirements at the time of an application for re-enrolment.

Transfer from another Award

Students in another award may apply for admission into this course on successful completion of at least 6 units with a minimum GPA of 4.5.

Exit Pathways

Subject to Advanced Standing rules candidates who discontinue their studies in the Bachelor of Criminology/Bachelor of Laws may be eligible to exit with the Bachelor of Criminology on successful completion of 144 credit points as determined by the course rules of the Bachelor of Criminology.
Candidates who apply to discontinue their studies and exit with the Bachelor of Criminology must apply for readmission and will be subject to current course requirements for the Bachelor of Criminology/Bachelor of Laws. This may mean that they will not receive full recognition for their previous studies should the course structure have changed in response to University requirements.

Subject to meeting Advanced Standing rules candidates who discontinue their studies in the Bachelor of Laws may be eligible to exit with the Advanced Diploma in Legal Studies on completion of 72 credit points of law units (LAW, LS or LLM).
Candidates who apply to discontinue their studies and exit with the Bachelor of Laws must apply for readmission and will be subject to current course requirements for the Bachelor of Laws. This may mean that they will not receive full recognition for their previous studies should the course structure have changed in response to University requirements.

Appeals

Candidates are referred to the Academic Assessment Appeals Policy and the Academic Assessment Appeals Procedures.

Course Progression

Candidates are referred to the Course Progression Rule and the Course Progression Procedures.

Improper Conduct

Candidates are referred to the Student Coursework Academic Misconduct Rule and the Student Coursework Academic Misconduct Procedures.

Course Aims

The Bachelor of Criminology component is concerned with understanding social constructions of crime and criminality. It provides graduates with a unique opportunity to develop both theoretical and practical skills and an understanding of criminology within a local and international context.

The Bachelor of Laws component aims to graduate students who can demonstrate:

1. understanding and knowledge of Australian law and awareness of indigenous, international and theoretical perspectives;

2. competence in using legal research and analytical skills that equip them to work in the legal profession or in a broad range of law related occupations;

3. the ability to take a strategic approach to problem solving by applying critical and innovative thinking to complex legal issues and situations;

4. competence in oral and written communication;

5. the ability to work independently and in groups; and

6. professional judgement and knowledge of the ethical responsibilities associated with having completed a law degree.

7. LLB with Honours students: a comprehensive understanding of theoretical, comparative or interdisciplinary research to examine law's effect on society and the effectiveness of the Australian Legal System.

Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
  1. BCrim component: demonstrate an understanding of the causes and consequences of crime within Australia, including the role that the media and legal system play in shaping our understanding of crimes;
  2. demonstrate an understanding of the major criminological and sociological theoretical perspectives that explain both crime and deviance. Critically analyse, consolidate and apply this theoretical understanding to practical criminological scenarios with a deeper understanding of the issues at hand and a wider knowledge base;
  3. demonstrate the practical use of criminological research and study within the criminal justice system to apply research methods and practical skills to their theoretical knowledge of the criminal justice system;
  4. demonstrate a critical understanding of the Australian Criminal Justice System and the key institutions within this system, the key local and international political and social changes that have shaped the progression of the Australian Criminal Justice System;
  5. demonstrate an ability to understand and critically evaluate criminological literature, including policy and government documents and media articles to locate, evaluate and apply information from a variety of academic and non-academic sources in an appropriate manner;
  6. examine criminological research drawing on knowledge of disciplines related to criminology, from either sociology, social work, law, psychology or forensic science; and
  7. apply academic writing skills and communicate findings in an appropriate form and at an appropriate level.
  8. LLB component: demonstrate a sound knowledge of the fundamental areas of law prescribed by the admitting authorities; a wide range of legal and theoretical concepts, values, and principles; and have an awareness of international law, and an appreciation of Indigenous legal issues;
  9. communicate in an effective and persuasive manner an argument, advice or opinion that is clear, coherent and logically sustainable, to both legal and non-legal audiences, both orally and in writing;
  10. demonstrate an awareness of global legal, political and social perspectives;
  11. demonstrate an ability to design a research strategy and access legal resources including using practical applications that respond to the factual, legal, theoretical and policy issues, to achieve a considered outcome that represents an evaluation of the data generated;
  12. demonstrate an appreciation that the law will change and the need for both self-directed and professional legal education that seeks to ensure the currency of legal knowledge;
  13. demonstrate an ability to identify issues and apply legal knowledge and principles to complex problems and projects, with a view to constructing relevant, creative and ethically appropriate responses;
  14. demonstrate an ability to apply principles of professional and social responsibility in formulating considered responses to ethical issues that require an analysis and evaluation of a diverse range of values, norms and behaviours in the professional, societal and global contexts;
  15. demonstrate an ability to engage with others in a way that respects diverse opinions and perspectives to achieve relevant and efficient outcomes that reflect the contribution of all those involved; and
  16. demonstrate an ability to critically reflect upon and analyse law's effect on society and, where appropriate, develop arguments for reform.
  17. LLB with Honours students: demonstrate a sound knowledge of the fundamental areas of law prescribed by the admitting authorities; a wide range of legal and theoretical concepts, values and principles; and have an awareness of international law and an appreciation of Indigenous legal issues;
  18. communicate in an effective and persuasive manner an argument, advice or opinion that is clear, coherent and logically sustainable, to both legal and non-legal audiences, both orally and in writing;
  19. demonstrate an awareness of global legal, political and social perspectives;
  20. demonstrate an ability to design a research strategy and access legal resources including using practical applications that respond to the factual, legal, theoretical and policy issues, to achieve a considered outcome that represents an evaluation of the data generated;
  21. demonstrate an appreciation that the law will change and the need for both self-directed and professional legal education that seeks to ensure the currency of legal knowledge;
  22. demonstrate an ability to identify issues and apply legal knowledge and principles to complex problems and projects, with a view to constructing relevant, creative and ethically appropriate responses;
  23. demonstrate an ability to apply principles of professional and social responsibility in formulating considered responses to ethical issues that require an analysis and evaluation of a diverse range of values, norms and behaviours in the professional, societal and global contexts;
  24. demonstrate an ability to engage with others in a way that respects diverse opinions and perspectives to achieve relevant and efficient outcomes that reflect the contribution of all those involved;
  25. demonstrate an ability to critically reflect upon and analyse law's effect on society and, where appropriate, develop arguments for reform;
  26. conceive, plan and implement an independent programme of legal research that could take a theoretical, comparative or an interdisciplinary approach;
  27. develop and present an oral summary of an independent programme of legal research; and
  28. produce a written thesis that demonstrates original thinking, a high level of research skills and the ability to write critically.
Graduate Attributes
Knowledge of a Discipline

BCrim component: Graduates will demonstrate knowledge of criminology, the Australian criminal justice system, theoretical perspectives of crime, changing policy responses to crime control and the way in which crime is presented in media and political discourse. This knowledge will be taught in lectures, unit materials and online activities and assessed throughout the degree through a range of different activities. LLB component: Knowledge of the discipline is taught, practised and assessed in both core units and electives; in particular the fundamental discipline areas prescribed by the admitting authorities are taught in the core units. Students will demonstrate an understanding of these key areas that lead to accreditation as a barrister or solicitor in Australia. Students will also be encouraged to consider the law through indigenous, theoretical and international perspectives. Although the focus of an Australian law degree is Australian law, law units will often provide information about relevant law in other areas of the world in order to encourage a critical perspective. Legal resources may include international law, comparative material such as case-law and legislation from other jurisdictions and also social, political and economic perspectives. LLB with Honours students: Demonstrate in-depth knowledge of one particular area of law that the student has selected to research for their Honours thesis.

Communication Skills

BCrim component: Graduates will have developed skills that enable them to investigate, synthesise and communicate the ideas and information acquired from their study. Communication skills including oral, online and written communication skills that are appropriate for graduates to use within the workplace will be taught and practised in lectures, tutorials and online activities. LLB component: Both oral and written communication skills will be practised and assessed throughout the course. In particular, students will develop skills in legal writing and argument. These skills will benefit participants' ability to communicate with both clients and colleagues in both legal and non-legal contexts. LLB with Honours students: Communicate effectively and confidently orally and in written forms to present well-reasoned arguments, challenge existing theories and defend new ideas and theories in various modes based on doctrinal or interdisciplinary research.

Problem Solving

BCrim component: Graduates will demonstrate their ability to locate, evaluate and apply information from a variety of sources throughout their degree. Graduates will be able to evaluate and interpret information in a useful manner. Graduates will be assessed on their ability to deconstruct assignment tasks and to integrate theory and literature into their work.

Information Literacy

BCrim component: Graduates will demonstrate their ability to identify relevant literature and their ability to critically analyse the literature. They will be taught, and directed to, relevant criminological literature and how to assess its validity. LLB component: Students will be required to identify, access and navigate complex databases to retrieve primary and secondary material. This requires them to obtain a high level of information literacy. Students will also be required to critically evaluate this information to complete assessment tasks. LLB with Honours students: Demonstrate an understanding of relevant research methodologies and techniques and their appropriate application within law and other disciplines, and use information collected or generated to construct new concepts or create new understandings.

Ethical Conduct and Social Responsibility

BCrim component: Graduates will be taught about their professional responsibilities as a researcher to provide balanced and accurate research and data. In addition, graduates will be taught that they have a social responsibility to question and challenge some 'facts'. LLB component: Students are encouraged to learn and work independently, and where appropriate, to collaborate effectively. Students are also encouraged to communicate in ways that are effective, appropriate and persuasive for legal and non-legal audiences.

Lifelong Learning

BCrim component: Graduates will develop their intellectual capacity and critical thinking skills through lectures, unit materials, guided reading and online activities. Through completing the assessments, graduates will be provided with the necessary lifelong skills to be able to research, write and discuss social issues. These are transferable and essential lifelong skills. LLB component: This course equips students with the skills needed to ensure the ongoing currency of their legal knowledge; appreciate law as a tool for social justice; and have an understanding that law is a dynamic discipline.

Independence and Collaboration

BCrim component: Graduates will be able to participate in professional, respectful and ethical discussions and work collaboratively with others. The development of collaboration and group participation skills will be developed through on-campus and online interactive teaching. LLB component: Students are encouraged to learn and work independently, and where appropriate to collaborate effectively. Students are also encouraged to communicate in ways that are effective, appropriate and persuasive for legal and non-legal audiences.

How to Apply

Domestic Students

All domestic students apply through the link below

For more information, click here

International Students

International students apply direct to UNE through UNE International

For more information, click here

Contact Us

Please select whether you are a current student or a future student:

Other Channels

Live chat Phone

Request Contact

Please contact me via

As a current student you need to send your enquiry through AskUNE.

Please click here to access your AskUNE account