Master of Computer Science

Why study the Master of Computer Science at UNE?

Information and computing technology affects all aspects of modern life and there is a worldwide shortage of ICT professionals. Its applications now include, not only commerce and science, but also health, education, engineering, transport, government, entertainment, sport, and social networking. It has become so complex that only well-educated professionals are capable of developing and applying ICT systems in modern organisations. Even professionals in other disciplines need a sound understanding of ICT to perform their own jobs efficiently and effectively.

Emphasis is placed upon the structured design of algorithms for computer-based implementations of real-life tasks. The interactive execution, analysis and use of programs are discussed together with advanced algorithmic designs and programming techniques; informal notions of program specification and verification; a high-level description of the abstract architecture of the von Neumann machine; numerical and non-numerical applications; and social issues.

This course provides a comprehensive, modern postgraduate education in the principles and practice of ICT together with the opportunity to gain enhanced knowledge and skills in research.

Master of Computer Science graduates are eligible to apply for admission to PhD candidature, upon successful completion of the thesis.

Career Opportunities

ICT graduates are in high demand and career options include a wide variety of positions in the IT industry, including business intelligence expert, e-business development, information systems manager, IT project manager, software architect, software quality/testing specialist and systems analyst.

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Degree Snapshot

DURATION

1 or 1.5 Years Full-time
Up to 6 years Part-time

FEES

CSP (quotas apply)
Full Fee
International

2017 STUDY OPTIONS
Armidale

Trimester 1, Off Campus
Trimester 1, On Campus
Trimester 2, Off Campus
Trimester 2, On Campus

Official Abbreviation MCompSc
Course Type Postgraduate
CRICOS Code 012207G
Commencing
Responsible Campus Admission Period Mode of Study
Armidale Trimester 1 Off Campus
Armidale Trimester 1 On Campus
Armidale Trimester 2 Off Campus
Armidale Trimester 2 On Campus
Course Duration
  • 1 or 1.5 Years Full-time
  • Up to 6 years Part-time
Fees CSP (quotas apply) / Full Fee / International
Total Credit Points 72
Intensive Schools

Mandatory intensive schools may be a requirement of some of the units in this course. See Unit Catalogue for specific requirements.

Entry Requirements

A candidate shall:

(a) hold an AQF Level 7 Bachelor qualification in a relevant discipline*; or

(b) hold an AQF Level 8 Graduate Certificate, Graduate Diploma or Bachelor with Honours qualification in a relevant discipline*.

*Relevant disciplines - include but are not limited to the following:

Computing Science

Information Systems

Information Technology

Additional Requirements

Inherent Requirements: Students must meet the Inherent Requirements in order to complete this course.

Candidates must have a knowledge of the programming language Java or C++.

Advanced Standing

Candidates are referred to the University Policy on Advanced Standing.

Candidates admitted under Rule (a) may be granted a maximum of 36 credit points of Advanced Standing based on units that were not part of the degree on which admission was based and may include 6 credit points on the basis of considerable demonstrated relevant professional experience.

Candidates admitted under Rule (b) shall be granted a maximum of 24 credit points of Block Advanced Standing based on their admission to candidature. Up to a further 12 credit points may be granted based on units that were not part of the degree on which admission was based. This may include 6 credit points on the basis of considerable demonstrated relevant professional experience.

No advanced standing will be granted for COSC592, COSC593, SCI500, SCI501 or SCI502.

Academic Colours

Powder Blue (BCC 193)

Further Information

You can find instant answers to many of your questions or contact UNE directly via AskUNE

These course rules & plans are ONLY to be used if you commenced, transferred or changed versions in the Master of Computer Science in 2017.

Admission to Candidature

A candidate shall:
(a) hold an AQF Level 7 Bachelor qualification in a relevant discipline*; or
(b) hold an AQF Level 8 Graduate Certificate or Graduate Diploma or Bachelor with Honours qualification in a relevant discipline*.

*Relevant disciplines include, but are not limited to:

Computer Science
Information Systems
Information Technology

Additional Requirements

Inherent Requirements

Students must meet the Inherent Requirements in order to complete this course.

Advanced Standing

Candidates are referred to the University Policy on Advanced Standing.

Candidates admitted under Rule (a) may be granted a maximum of 36 credit points of Advanced Standing based on units that were not part of the degree on which admission was based and may include 6 credit points on the basis of considerable demonstrated relevant professional experience.

Candidates admitted under Rule (b) shall be granted a maximum of 24 credit points of Block Advanced Standing based on their admission to candidature. Up to a further 12 credit points may be granted based on units that were not part of the degree on which admission was based. This may include 6 credit points on the basis of considerable demonstrated relevant professional experience.

No advanced standing shall be awarded for COSC592, COSC593, SCI501 or SCI502.

Period of Candidature

For candidates admitted under Rule (a), the period of candidature shall be:
(a) one and a half years as a full-time candidate;
(b) up to six years as a part-time candidate.

For candidates admitted under Rule (b), the period of candidature shall be:
(a) one year as a full-time candidate;
(b) up to four years as a part-time candidate.

Course Requirements

1. To qualify for the award a candidate admitted under Rule (a) must pass units to the value of 72 credit points including not more than 12 credit points at 400-level and at least 42 credit points at 500-level.

2. To qualify for the award a candidate admitted under Rule (b) must pass units to the value of 72 credit points including at least 42 credit points at 500-level.

Program of Study

Candidates shall complete an approved program of study comprising:

For candidates admitted under Rule (a)
Course Structure Credit Points
Core Units 24 cps
Listed Units 48 cps
Total 72 cps

To view complete Program of Study click here

For candidates admitted under Rule (b)
Course Structure Credit Points
Block Advanced Standing 24 cps
Core Units 24 cps
Listed Units 24 cps
Total 72 cps

To view complete Program of Study click here

Award of Degree

Candidates who meet the course requirements shall be awarded the Master of Computer Science.

Submission of Thesis

1. The thesis shall be written concisely in English and, except with the special permission of the school in exceptional circumstances, shall not exceed 20 000 words, exclusive of tables, plates, figures and appendices. A successful thesis shall show capacity on the part of the candidate for independence of thought and critical evaluation of the candidate's own and published work in his or her field of study. The candidate shall state generally in the preface and specifically throughout the thesis the source of his or her information and the extent to which he or she has used the work of others. The candidate may not present as the thesis any work that has been the basis of the award of a degree of this University or other institution but is not precluded from incorporating such work in the thesis provided that, in presenting the thesis, the candidate indicates the part of the work that has been so incorporated.

2. The candidate shall submit a pdf copy of the thesis to the School's Academic Manager's office, in the approved format.

Examination of Thesis

On the recommendation of the supervisor or supervisors, the school Teaching and Learning Committee will appoint two examiners, at least one will be external to the University. Examiners will be sent the relevant degree information.

The examiners of the thesis will be make recommendations on a grade and mark in accordance with the University Assessment Policy. Students will not be required to make subsequent changes or corrections to the examined thesis but the examiners' reports will be provided to the students as feedback.

In the case of where the examiners' mark differ by greater than 10%, examiners may consult with each other to reach a closer agreement, prior to a third examiner being sought.

Appeals

Candidates are referred to the Academic Assessment Appeals Policy and the Academic Assessment Appeals Procedures.

Course Progression

Candidates are referred to the Course Progression Rule and the Course Progression Procedures.

Improper Conduct

Candidates are referred to the Student Coursework Academic Misconduct Rule and the Student Coursework Academic Misconduct Procedures.

Course Aims

The Master of Computer Science is designed for computer science/information technology practitioners. The aim of the course is to enable students to enhance their competencies in a range of areas critical to computer science/information technology; to develop a knowledge of research principles and methods; and to apply knowledge and skills to plan and execute a substantial research-based project. The course will enable students to attain the theoretical knowledge, problem solving and analytical skills and the practical experience needed to be an effective computer science/information technology practitioner.

Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
  1. demonstrate through their own practice and research a mastery of scientific knowledge that includes knowledge of recent developments in computer science, established knowledge and practices and specialised skills in computer science;
  2. demonstrate through their own practice and research mastery of technical competencies in the field laboratory and professional workplace related to computer science; and knowledge of research principles and methods applicable to computer science;
  3. demonstrate mastery of a body of scientific knowledge by planning and executing a substantial research-based project, capstone experience and/or piece of research that integrates their own research findings with the current body of disciplinary knowledge/paradigms; demonstrating a capacity to make original contributions to scientific knowledge;
  4. conduct a research investigation under academic supervision in a research environment by critically analyse a complex problem, identify research questions, and apply established theories to their research question; justify and interpret theoretical propositions, methodologies, conclusions and professional decisions to specialist and non-specialist audiences; and analysing, interpreting and critically evaluating research findings;
  5. be effective communicators of science by communicating scientific ideas and research findings to specialist and non-specialist audiences using a variety of written and oral communication modes; and
  6. be accountable for their own learning and scientific work by applying creativity and initiative to new situations; operating with a high level of personal autonomy within a research environment; planning and executing a substantial research-based project, capstone experience and/or piece of research while complying with regulatory frameworks and practising professional ethics relevant to computer science.
Graduate Attributes
Knowledge of a Discipline

Graduates have an increased knowledge of computing science/information technology through the learning and teaching activities associated within each unit and interaction with the unit coordinators, lecturers and tutors, including lectures, tutorials, workshops, online activities and discussion board, and work and study in a global environment. Graduates have an in-depth understanding of the risk and benefits associated with the global nature of computing science and information technology. Students are assessed using: program design tasks; computational assignments; theory based assignments; individual and group project reports; and written examinations.

Communication Skills

Graduates are able to communicate results, information and arguments relevant to computer science/information technology to a range of audiences, for a range of purposes and via a range of media.

Problem Solving

Graduates are able to investigate and solve problems by using recognised methods and appropriate practical techniques in computer science/information technology. Students practise and are assessed on their problem solving skills in all units and particularly in planning and execution of the research project.

Information Literacy

Graduates are able to access information from a range of sources, using a range of technologies, and they are able to synthesise and critically evaluate that information.

Ethical Conduct and Social Responsibility

Graduates are able to take social responsibility by recognising the relevant and ethical frameworks within which computer science is practised. Reflection on social responsibility and professional practice in computer science/information technology is embedded in course content and graduates are able to work responsibly and ethically in both individual and team environments.

Lifelong Learning

Computer science/information technology is a very rapidly changing field of study. Graduates have the fundamental skills which enable them to supplement their knowledge and adapt to the changes in computer science/information technology. This is taught and practised by providing core skills and exposing students to a variety of programming languages, environments and specialised systems.

Independence and Collaboration

Graduates are able to apply their skills and knowledge individually and as part of collaborative teams. They are able to work with intellectual independence, and to collaborate with technical and non-technical colleagues and customers. Working in a group environment is an essential component of the course and in the professional practice of software development. To develop these skills, a number of units in the course require students to work in groups and provide guidance and assessment on group work.

How to Apply

Domestic Students

All domestic students apply direct to UNE

For more information, click here

International Students

International students apply direct to UNE through UNE International

For more information, click here

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