AGRO522 Integrated Weed Management

Updated: 27 September 2019
Credit Points 6
Offering
Location Teaching Period Mode of Study
Armidale Trimester 2 Online
Intensive School(s)

Intensive schools are for students enrolled in Online Mode only, unless specified in the notes.

Start Finish Attendance Notes
11 August 2020 14 August 2020 Mandatory None
Supervised Exam There is a supervised exam at the end of the teaching period in which you are enrolled. The paper-based exam will be held at an established exam venue, and coordinated by UNE Exams Unit.
Pre-requisites candidature in a postgraduate award
Co-requisites None
Restrictions AGRO422
Notes None
Combined Units AGRO422 - Integrated Weed Management
Coordinator(s) Brian Sindel (bsindel@une.edu.au)
Unit Description

This unit examines weed management and the integration of cultural, biological and chemical control techniques in a range of ecosystems with the option to specialise in cropping systems, pastures, vegetables, orchards and vineyards, lawns and turf, plantation forests, conservation reserves and national parks, rangelands or aquatic systems.

Materials Textbook information will be displayed approximately 8 weeks prior to the commencement of the teaching period. Please note that textbook requirements may vary from one teaching period to the next.
Disclaimer Unit information may be subject to change prior to commencement of the teaching period.
Assessment Assessment information will be published prior to commencement of the teaching period.
Learning Outcomes (LO) Upon completion of this unit, students will be able to:
  1. demonstrate an advanced and integrated understanding of the subject by outlining the nature of weeds;
  2. demonstrate an advanced and integrated understanding of the subject by identifying a wide range of important weed species;
  3. critically analyse, evaluate and reflect upon complex information about how weeds affect different types of ecosystems, interpreting and transmitting this knowledge to specialist and non-specialist audiences in written or verbal forms;
  4. display autonomy, expert judgement and responsibility in discussing the range of management options available for weed control;
  5. research and apply established theories about weed management, particularly in regards to an economic and historical context; and
  6. research and apply established theoretical aspects of this subject so as to critically explore integrated weed management systems.