ANCH305 Greek Democracy and its Enemies

UNE has cancelled in-person, paper-based exams for Trimester 2. Instead, all exams will either be transferred to other modes of assessment, or offered online. There may be some discrepancies to published unit information while we work through the University processes to approve the changes and reflect them through publication. Information about online exams is available on UNE's Online Supervised Exams page.

Updated: 07 November 2019
Credit Points 6
Offering
Location Teaching Period Mode of Study
Armidale Trimester 1 Online
Armidale Trimester 1 On Campus
Intensive School(s) None
Supervised Exam There is no supervised examination.
Pre-requisites 12cp in ANCH or HIST or HINQ or any 24cp or candidature in a postgraduate award
Co-requisites None
Restrictions ANCH201 or ANCH301 or ANCH405 or ANCH505
Notes None
Combined Units ANCH505 - Greek Democracy and its Enemies
Coordinator(s) Tristan Taylor (ttaylo33@une.edu.au)
Unit Description

A study of imperialism and democratic institutions in the Greek world from the middle of the fifth century BC to the death of Alexander the Great. The unit focuses on Athenian imperialism in the fifth century, the practice of democratic government in Athens, the growth of Macedonian influence in the Greek world in the fourth century, the reign of Philip II and Alexander's conquest of the Persian empire. The unit has a strong focus on methodology in the study of Ancient History.

Prescribed Material
Mandatory

Text(s):

Note: Students are expected to purchase prescribed material. Please note that textbook requirements may vary from one teaching period to the next.

A History of My Times

ISBN: 9780140441758
Xenophon (ed. R. Warner), Pearson 1979

Text refers to: Trimester 1, On Campus and Online

History of the Peloponnesian War

ISBN: 9780140440393
Thucydides, Pearson revised 1972 ed. 1963

Text refers to: Trimester 1, On Campus and Online

The Age of Alexander

ISBN: 9780140449358
Plutarch (ed. T. Duff), Pearson 1st ed. (reprint) 2012

Text refers to: Trimester 1, On Campus and Online

The Athenian Constitution

ISBN: 9780140444315
Aristotle (ed. P. Rhodes), Pearson 2002

Text refers to: Trimester 1, On Campus and Online

The Campaigns of Alexander

ISBN: 9780140442533
Arrian (ed. A. de Selincourt and revised by J.R. Hamilton), Pearson 1976

Text refers to: Trimester 1, On Campus and Online

The Rise and Fall of Athens

ISBN: 9780140441024
Plutarch (ed. I. Scott-Kilvert), Pearson 1964

Text refers to: Trimester 1, On Campus and Online

Recommended Material
Optional

Text(s):

Note: Recommended material may be held in the University Library - purchase is optional

The Greek World 479-323 BC

ISBN: 9780415602921
Hornblower, S., Routledge 4th ed. 2011

Text refers to: Trimester 1, On Campus and Online

Disclaimer Unit information may be subject to change prior to commencement of the teaching period.
Assessment
Must
Complete
Title Exam Length Weight Mode No. Words
Compulsory Assessment 1 5% 500
Assessment Notes

Quiz

Relates to Learning Outcomes (LO)

LO: 1,4,5

Compulsory Assessment 2 40% 2000
Assessment Notes

Essay

Relates to Learning Outcomes (LO)

LO: 1-6

Compulsory Assessment 3 5% 500
Assessment Notes

Quiz

Relates to Learning Outcomes (LO)

LO: 1,4,5

Compulsory Assessment 4 50% 2000
Assessment Notes

Final Essay

Relates to Learning Outcomes (LO)

LO: 1-6


Learning Outcomes (LO) Upon completion of this unit, students will be able to:
  1. demonstrate broad and coherent theoretical understanding of Greek democracy and politics, and the differences in the political systems of Greece in the period 454-323 BC;
  2. independently research political and historical theories about Greek politics, history, and society in the Hellenistic World, thereby demonstrating autonomy, well-developed judgement and responsibility as a learner;
  3. review critically, analyse, consolidate and synthesise knowledge about Greek politics and society from both written and non-written primary and secondary sources;
  4. demonstrate a broad understanding of internal Greek city-state politics and international affairs in the period 454-323 BC, and reflect critically on and analyse political interests, institutions, and history in this period;
  5. generate and critically evaluate complex ideas and concepts about political leadership, governance, imperialism, and history in the Hellenistic World; and
  6. construct and communicate a clear, coherent, evidence-based written argument dealing with theoretical propositions and conclusions about political leadership and imperialism in the Hellenistic world.