COMM589 Human Rights on Screen

Updated: 16 March 2018
Credit Points 6
Offering Not offered in 2019
Intensive School(s) None
Supervised Exam There is no supervised examination.
Pre-requisites candidature in a postgraduate award
Co-requisites None
Restrictions COMM389
Notes

offered in even-numbered years only

Combined Units COMM389 - Human Rights on Screen
Coordinator(s) Fincina Hopgood (fhopgood@une.edu.au)
Unit Description

There is a new, exciting field of industry practice that uses screen media for human rights awareness and advocacy. Using an interdisciplinary approach that blends screen and media studies with history, philosophy and international law, this unit examines the portrayal of human rights issues in cinema, television and online platforms from Australia and other countries. Students will apply their knowledge and skills by developing a proposal for a human rights festival. By exploring new developments in screen studies research and production with links to film festivals, activism and social change, this unit offers a dynamic learning experience that is engaged with the wider world.

Materials Textbook information will be displayed approximately 8 weeks prior to the commencement of the teaching period. Please note that textbook requirements may vary from one teaching period to the next.
Disclaimer Unit information may be subject to change prior to commencement of the teaching period.
Assessment Assessment information will be published prior to commencement of the teaching period.
Learning Outcomes (LO) Upon completion of this unit, students will be able to:
  1. demonstrate advanced knowledge and in-depth understanding of the historical and cultural contexts of a range of human rights issues;
  2. demonstrate sophisticated understanding of a range of screen media forms, genres and techniques;
  3. apply advanced skills of analysis to investigate how various forms of screen media are used to represent human rights issues;
  4. undertake independent research to inform detailed analysis of a case study; and
  5. communicate and present complex ideas and arguments coherently, using appropriate disciplinary forms and conventions of academic writing.