GEPL311 Catchment to Coast

Updated: 18 February 2019
Credit Points 6
Offering
Location Teaching Period Mode of Study
Armidale Trimester 1 Online
Armidale Trimester 1 On Campus
Intensive School(s) None
Supervised Exam There is no supervised examination.
Pre-requisites 24cp or candidature in a postgraduate award
Co-requisites None
Restrictions GEPL211 or GEPL511
Notes None
Combined Units GEPL511 - Catchment to Coast
Coordinator(s) Michael Reid (mreid24@une.edu.au)
Unit Description

This unit follows the movement of water from the atmosphere to the land and down to the ocean. It provides an introduction to hydrology and fluvial and coastal geomorphology. Topics include rainfall patterns and climatic change, catchment drainage, soil erosion, sediment transport, the natural variability and history of catchment and coastal systems and how human activities impact these systems in the context of their history and variability.

Materials Textbook information will be displayed approximately 8 weeks prior to the commencement of the teaching period. Please note that textbook requirements may vary from one teaching period to the next.
Disclaimer Unit information may be subject to change prior to commencement of the teaching period.
Assessment Assessment information will be published prior to commencement of the teaching period.
Learning Outcomes (LO) Upon completion of this unit, students will be able to:
  1. demonstrate coherent theoretical knowledge of the processes and controls associated with the water cycle and particularly the movement of water on and through the surface and subsurface of the Earth;
  2. evaluate how these processes interact with and modify catchment landscapes including slopes, soils and watercourses;
  3. apply knowledge and judgement to address the management issues and challenges associated with catchment processes and landforms, modelling skills applicable in a career in this field; and
  4. analyse and interpret the natural variability and history of catchments and how human activities impact these systems in the context of this history and variability.