HIST308 Crusader Europe, 1095-1453

Updated: 13 April 2017
Credit Points 6
Offering Not offered in 2018
Intensive School(s)

Intensive schools are for students enrolled in Online Mode only, unless specified in the notes.

Start Finish Attendance Notes
Non-Mandatory (Only when available in Trimester 3). Both on campus and online students are encouraged to attend the intensive school which will cover the entire trimesters work. This will involve face-to-face lectures and tutorials.
Supervised Exam There is a UNE Supervised Examination held at the end of the teaching period in which you are enrolled.
Pre-requisites 12cp ANCH or HINQ or HIST or RELS or any 24cp or candidature in a postgraduate award
Co-requisites None
Restrictions ANCH241 or ANCH341 or HIST208 or HIST408 or HIST508
Notes

(Only when available in Trimester 3) Both on campus and online students are encouraged to attend the intensive school which will cover the entire trimesters work. This will involve face-to-face lectures and tutorials.

Combined Units HIST508 - Crusader Europe, 1095-1453
Coordinator(s) Thomas Fudge (tfudge@une.edu.au)
Unit Description

A study of religious war between the eleventh and fifteenth centuries (1095 CE to 1453 CE) with a focus on efforts to combat Islam and liberate the Near East. There will be an emphasis upon religious practice, theology, political and military motivations. Crusades against Christian heretics also form an important chapter in this period.

Materials Textbook information will be displayed approximately 8 weeks prior to the commencement of the teaching period. Please note that textbook requirements may vary from one teaching period to the next.
Disclaimer Unit information may be subject to change prior to commencement of the teaching period.
Assessment Assessment information will be published prior to commencement of the teaching period.
Learning Outcomes (LO) Upon completion of this unit, students will be able to:
  1. demonstrate a broad and coherent understanding of crusader history to analyse some of the most significant issues;
  2. apply a critical understanding of human behaviour in an historically different context;
  3. demonstrate their understanding of historical methodology;
  4. apply their ability to locate and use appropriate sources of information and analysis at an undergraduate level;
  5. present a clear, coherent and independent exposition of knowledge and ideas by writing structured prose and framing arguments in the accepted manner of the discipline; and
  6. demonstrate responsibility and accountability for own learning through their assignment work.