HIST313 Crime, Protest and Reform in the British World, 1780-1860

Updated: 29 March 2018
Credit Points 6
Offering Not offered in 2019
Intensive School(s) None
Supervised Exam There is a supervised exam at the end of the teaching period in which you are enrolled. The paper-based exam will be held at an established exam venue, and coordinated by UNE Exams Unit.
Pre-requisites 12cp in ANCH or CRIM or HIST or HINQ or RELS or SOCY or any 24cp or candidature in postgraduate award
Co-requisites None
Restrictions HIST218 or HIST318
Notes None
Combined Units None
Coordinator(s) Matthew Allen (mallen28@une.edu.au)
Unit Description

Between 1780 and 1860 Britain became the first industrial nation at the centre of an unrivalled commercial empire spanning the globe. However at the same time, elite control of British society was threatened by new wealth, radical ideas, popular protest, rural unrest and urban disorder. This unit will examine this period of conflict and seek to explain why Britain modernised through reform and not revolution. Students will learn about the hierarchical nature of traditional British society, and the challenges posed by extremes of poverty and wealth, class conflict, crime and criminality and new notions of freedom and equality. They will then undertake a guided research project exploring a particular episode of social conflict in the British world, ranging from the Irish Rebellion to the Rum Rebellion and the Gordon Riots to the campaigns for the First Reform Act.

Materials Textbook information will be displayed approximately 8 weeks prior to the commencement of the teaching period. Please note that textbook requirements may vary from one teaching period to the next.
Disclaimer Unit information may be subject to change prior to commencement of the teaching period.
Assessment Assessment information will be published prior to commencement of the teaching period.
Learning Outcomes (LO) Upon completion of this unit, students will be able to:
  1. display a knowledge of some significant issues in late eighteenth and early nineteenth century British social history;
  2. exhibit an understanding of human behaviour in an historically different context;
  3. demonstrate skills in, and an understanding of, historical methodology;
  4. demonstrate their capacity to locate and use appropriate sources of information and analysis; and
  5. write structured prose and frame arguments in the accepted manner of the discipline.