HIST511 Crime, Incarceration, Servitude: Historical Views

Updated: 02 November 2018
Credit Points 6
Offering
Responsible Campus Teaching Period Mode of Study
Armidale Trimester 1 Online
Intensive School(s) None
Supervised Exam There is no supervised examination.
Pre-requisites candidature in a postgraduate award
Co-requisites None
Restrictions None
Notes None
Combined Units None
Coordinator(s) Andrew Piper (andrew.piper@une.edu.au)
Unit Description

Enslavement, incarceration and servitude are part of the historical social fabric of many cultures. Such practices allowed societies to order their world while they simultaneously served as a means to punish and enforce social control. Incarceration has been used as a form of punishment for criminal activities, as a means to detain those perceived of holding undesirable ideologies or illnesses, and as a means to maximise profit through the use of unfree labour. This unit will take a historical and theoretical approach to the study of the interrelationships between crime (in its broadest definition), incarceration and servitude, through specific case studies across a diverse selection of historical periods, cultures and political contexts. Through these case studies students will explore a range of thematic issues through subjects as diverse as crime and punishment in ancient Rome, the rise of the prison, and a range of other institutional settings, as well as corporal punishment.

Materials No text required
Disclaimer Unit information may be subject to change prior to commencement of the teaching period.
Assessment
Must
Complete
Title Exam Length Weight Mode No. Words
Compulsory Assessment 1 50% 3000
Assessment Notes

Essay

Relates to Learning Outcomes (LO)

LO: 1-5

Compulsory Assessment 2 50% 3000
Assessment Notes

Essay

Relates to Learning Outcomes (LO)

LO: 1-5


Learning Outcomes (LO) Upon completion of this unit, students will be able to:
  1. display an expert understanding of the concepts of incarceration and servitude as appropriate to the context of their chosen area of study;
  2. critically discuss historical issues and problems that specifically relate to the context of selected topic areas;
  3. select, evaluate and synthesise ideas from primary and other sources;
  4. present a coherent and sustained argument addressing effective communication strategies to present a properly documented argument addressing an historical problem or issue; and
  5. demonstrate an advanced understanding of the relevance of historical problems and issues to contemporary societies.