PAIS590 Politics in the Developing World

Updated: 04 February 2019
Credit Points 6
Offering
Responsible Campus Teaching Period Mode of Study
Armidale Trimester 1 Online
Intensive School(s) None
Supervised Exam There is no supervised examination.
Pre-requisites candidature in a postgraduate award
Co-requisites None
Restrictions PAIS390
Notes None
Combined Units PAIS390 - Politics in the Developing World
Coordinator(s) Xiang Gao (xgao5@une.edu.au)
Unit Description

This unit explores a range of historical and contemporary issues that have impacted on the developing world. The unit introduces students to competing conceptual approaches to the study of politics in the developing world and deals with a variety of topics such as colonialism and post-colonialism, inequality, ethnopolitics, democratisation, religion, conflict, aid, state and civil society. The unit compares and contrasts the experiences of developing countries in Asia, Africa, the Middle East and Latin America.

Prescribed Material
Mandatory

Text(s):

Note: Students are expected to purchase prescribed material. Please note that textbook requirements may vary from one teaching period to the next.

Politics in the Developing World

ISBN: 9780198737438
Burnell, P., Randall, V. and Rakner, L., Oxford University Press 5th ed. 2017

Text refers to: Trimester 1, Online

Disclaimer Unit information may be subject to change prior to commencement of the teaching period.
Assessment
Must
Complete
Title Exam Length Weight Mode No. Words
Compulsory Assessment 1 20% 1000
Assessment Notes

Quiz

Relates to Learning Outcomes (LO)

LO: 1,2

Compulsory Assessment 2 20% 1000
Assessment Notes

Quiz

Relates to Learning Outcomes (LO)

LO: 1,2

Compulsory Assessment 3 60% 3000
Assessment Notes

Writing task

Relates to Learning Outcomes (LO)

LO: 1-5


Learning Outcomes (LO) Upon completion of this unit, students will be able to:
  1. demonstrate an advanced and appropriately abstract knowledge of: competing approaches to politics in the developing world and their conceptual underpinnings; and the signifiance and complexities of economic, social and political change in the developing world from a global perspective;
  2. demonstrate an advanced understanding of a range of issues and challenges that have impacted on the developing world over the last fifty years;
  3. appropriately and accurately apply core concepts, in particular the ?state?, to reflect critically upon and analyse political issues in the developing world;
  4. independently develop, through synthesising and rigorously evaluating evidence from a wide range of sources, nuanced and theoretically-informed arguments about the politics of development and communicate these in a compelling manner; and
  5. expertly research and critically analyse in a creatively written essay, the relationship between politics and development.